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Part 2: Outline of the Survey Results


II. School

2. Going to school: significance and evaluations

(1) Significance of going to school
Q8  [HAND R CARD 10]
(FOR THOSE ATTENDING SCHOOL) Which of the following do you think you have gained or experienced through your education with respect to the school you currently attend?
(FOR THOSE WHO FINISHED SCHOOL) If you do not currently go to school, which of the items on this card do you think you have gained or experienced through your education? Think about the school you attended last and choose as many as are appropriate.
(MULTIPLE ANSWERS POSSIBLE)
  1. General and basic knowledge
  2. Specialized knowledge
  3. Work skills
  4. Better educational background and qualifications
  5. Cultivated my talent
  6. Improved my friendship with others
  7. Learned from the advice and good example of teachers
  8. How to enjoy free time
  9. No particular significance
  10. Do not know
  11. Refused

Among Japanese youth, given the most as the response to questioning about the significance of going to school was "Improved my friendship with others" (65.7%). The responses that followed were, in descending order, "General and basic knowledge" (55.9%), "Better educational background and qualifications" (54.5%), and "Specialized knowledge" (51.1%).

Comparing the five countries, in South Korea, "Better educational background and qualifications, " at 58.8%, was given most. The responses that followed were, in descending order, "Specialized knowledge" (53.9%), "General and basic knowledge" (44.9%), "Improved my friendship with others" (41.2%), and "Cultivated my talent" (39.6%).
     In contrast, in the U.S.A., "General and basic knowledge, " at 79.1%, was given most. The responses that followed were, in descending order, "Better educational background and qualifications" (54.1%), "Specialized knowledge" (50.5%), and "Learned from the advice and good example of teachers" (46.0%).
     In the U.K., "General and basic knowledge, " at 63.0%, was given most. The other responses, in descending order, were "Better educational background and qualifications" (45.5%), "Work skills" (44.6%), "Improved my friendship with others" (40.2%), and "Specialized knowledge" (37.3%).
     In France, the responses, in descending order, were "General and basic knowledge" (66.9%), "Specialized knowledge" (57.4%), "Better educational background and qualifications" (45.3%), "Cultivated my talent" (44.6%), and "Work skills" (43.5%).

Table 2-2-1-1: Significance of going to school < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-1-1: Significance of going to school

A comparison with previous surveys on Japanese youth indicates that the percentages of all responses in this survey were higher than those of the previous survey.

Table 2-2-1-2: Significance of going to school (changes over the years) < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-1-2: Significance of going to school (changes over the years)

An analysis of Japanese youth by gender difference shows that there were no differences.

Table 2-2-1-3: Significance of going to school (by gender) < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-1-3: Significance of going to school (by gender)

A breakdown of Japanese youth by current school enrollment status shows that higher percentages of those enrolled in school than those not gave "Better educational background and qualifications" (those attending school: 61.4%; those who finished school: 48.6%), "Specialized knowledge" (same as above: 62.0%, 41.9%), and "Cultivated my talent" (same as above: 45.4%, 24.5%).

Table 2-2-1-4: Significance of going to school (by current school enrollment status) < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-1-4: Significance of going to school (by current school enrollment status)


Table 2-2-1-5: Significance of going to school [reference]: five-country comparison among those currently enrolled in school < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-1-5: Significance of going to school [reference]: five-country comparison among those currently enrolled in school


Table 2-2-1-6: Significance of going to school [reference]:
five-country comparison among those not currently enrolled in school < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-1-6: Significance of going to school [reference]: five-country comparison among those not currently enrolled in school

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(2) Factors of success
Q9  [HAND R CARD 11] Which two factors on this list do you think are most important to becoming successful in life? Please choose up to two of the categories on the card.
(UP TO TWO ANSWERS)
  1. Family position and social rank, parents' social status
  2. Personal abilities
  3. Personal effort – how hard one works
  4. Having a good education
  5. Luck or chance
  6. Do not know
  7. Refused

A look at Japanese youth shows that among the factors of success "Personal effort - how hard one works, " at 79.2%, was given most. The responses that followed were, in descending order, "Personal abilities" (51.5%) and "Luck or chance" (39.3%).

Comparing the five countries, similar to Japan, in South Korea and the U.S.A. "Personal effort - how hard one works" was given by the highest percentage ( South Korea : 66.4%; U.S.A. : 71.7%). In South Korea, the responses that followed were, in descending order, "Personal abilities" (59.7%), "Having a good education" (25.8%), and "Family position and social rank, parents' social status" (24.2%).
     In contrast, in the U.S.A, the responses that followed were, in descending order, "Having a good education" (51.7%) and "Personal abilities" (45.8%).
     In the U.K. and France, "Personal effort - how hard one works" ( U.K. : 58.3%; France: 62.7%) and "Personal abilities" (same as above: 57.4%, 64.6%) were given by the 50-59% range and 60-69% range, respectively, and therefore cited in similar numbers. The responses that followed were "Having a good education" (37.4%) in the U.K. and "Luck or chance" (32.3%) in France, both responses given in the 30-39% range.

Table 2-2-2-1: Factors of success < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-2-1: Factors of success

A comparison with previous surveys on Japanese youth reveals no changes from previous surveys.

Table 2-2-2-2: Factors of success (changes over the years) < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-2-2: Factors of success (changes over the years)

A breakdown by gender of Japanese youth also reveals no differences.

Table 2-2-2-3: Factors of success (by gender) < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-2-3: Factors of success (by gender)

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(3) Satisfaction with student life
Q10  [HAND R CARD 12] Are you satisfied or dissatisfied with your student life? If you do not go to school at present, please answer based on the time you did attend school.
(SINGLE ANSWER ONLY)
  1. Satisfied
  2. Somewhat satisfied
  3. Somewhat dissatisfied
  4. Dissatisfied
  5. Do not know
  6. Refused

A look at Japanese youth's degree of satisfaction with student life shows that 'Satisfied' was given by 85.1% ("Satisfied": 43.7% + "Somewhat satisfied": 41.5%).

Comparing the five countries, in all countries 'Satisfied' accounted for the majority of responses. The percentage of those giving 'Satisfied' in the four countries of France (85.6%), the U.K. (85.4%), Japan (85.1%), and the U.S.A. (85.1%) were all in the 80-89% range and more or less close to each other. In South Korea the corresponding figure was 70.9%.

Table 2-2-3-1: Satisfaction with student life < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-3-1: Satisfaction with student life

A comparison with the previous survey on Japanese youth shows that the percentage of those giving 'Satisfied' (78.6% in the seventh to 85.1% in the eighth) increased by 7 points over the previous survey.

Table 2-2-3-2: Satisfaction with student life (changes over the years) < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-3-2: Satisfaction with student life (changes over the years)

An analysis of Japanese youth by gender difference shows that there were no differences.

Table 2-2-3-3: Satisfaction with student life (by gender) < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-3-3: Satisfaction with student life (by gender)

A breakdown of Japanese youth by current school enrollment status shows that the percentage of those giving 'Satisfied' (those attending school: 90.2%; those who finished school: 80.9%) was higher among those currently enrolled.

Table 2-2-3-4: Satisfaction with student life (by current school enrollment status) < CSV Data >
Table 2-2-3-4: Satisfaction with student life (by current school enrollment status)

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